What I Do When I’m Embarrassed

What I Do When I’m Embarrassed

What I Do When I’m Embarrassed

bagonhead

In one of the most notable scenes of one of my all time favorite chic-flicks, Bridget Jones chides her love interest (So Austen-ly named Mr. Darcy) for making her feel like an idiot.

“I already feel like an idiot most of the time anyway,” she says. Yeah, I get it.  While I (thankfully) don’t slide down fire poles and reveal my undergarments to an entire nation of viewers or land my parachute in pig feces, a la Ms. Jones, I do have my own specialty brand of sticking my foot in it.

So, what do I do when I feel like walking around town with a paper bag on my head?

Why, revel in it, of course.

Say WHAT?!?!

Yeah, you heard me right. I look like a dope and I’m proud.

Ok, ok, ok, maybe that’s taking things a bit too far, but here’s the deal: when I make a donkey of myself, I take a deep breath and own it. 

Sometimes, it’s a legitimate mistake, and I need to own up to it. Often, I am just down right uncomfortable.

That is what the inner critic wants us to feel. Uncomfortable. “Don’t share your writing.  No one will like it.”  “Everyone will call it stupid.” “Are you serious?  Three adjectives in a row?  And you call yourself a writer!”

Ta Ta, Inner Critic.

That’s what Date With The Muse is all about: finding so much strength in your creative self that your inner critic runs out of (hot) air to breathe.

It’s how I work one-on-one with my clients on their writing projects. And how I try to live each day. Ta Ta, Inner Critic.

Are you ready to say goodbye to your inner critic?  We’ve got a great, supportive Facebook group where you can share your word counts and get expert advice. Please join us.

Ah, yes, and while we’re on embarrassing things…  I’ve been taking some big risks with video. Have you seen the latest antics? In the spirit of ousting the inner critic and ushering in the muse, I share it with you. Proudly.

While we’re waxing poetic on embarrassment, here’s another confession: one of my first writing assignments was as the “Fun Page” editor for my high school newspaper. Following the lead of a magazine I was into at the time, I created a column of funniest embarrassing moments.

Mostly, it was an opportunity for my peers to prank the newspaper’s  mailbox with things like “One time I was caught in public doing X, which was especially embarrassing because I’m the high school principal.” 

Ah, fun times as a first time editor. Shout back at me: What was your first writing assignment?  OR your most embarrassing moment?  Maybe your first embarrassing writing moment…

I just love to hear your stories! Drop a line in the comments below or give my company a call. We can discuss the best ways to deal with your noisy, inner critic. 

Editorializing the editor’s life

Editorializing the editor’s life

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When I am not writing, I am busy teaching others to write.  As such, I am the faculty editor of the student publication The Knightly News. I was recently asked to contribute this article to the alumni magazine outlining the work the student journalists do. Annalisa Parent Journalism Teacher Vermont

 

The Struggle for the RTP

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feltEditor’s Note: This reflection was written by a student in the Introduction to Journalism class I teach. I think his ideas on the struggle for the RTP or “Ready to Publish” are a universal part of writing life. What do you think?

By Will Hesslink

 

“I found that editing can be useful, but it can also be challenging.”

One very important part of publishing and writing is editing.

In the past, I have found that editing can be useful, but it can also be challenging. As we write, many different people read our articles and offer their suggestions. However, I know that it is important to have other people’s views and ideas. Other people’s advice helps make a piece more interesting.

 

 

“I found it difficult to have multiple opinions on my pieces, because each person who read it had their own ideas about how to improve it.”

 

But, in my own work, I found it difficult to have multiple opinions on my pieces. Each person who read my piece had their own ideas about how to improve it.

 At times, the ideas and suggestions were not the same. When that happened, I found it hard to edit because I had to find a middle ground. I needed to consolidate everyone’s ideas for making it better. I also found it hard to listen to other’s suggestions when I felt they did not  understood what I was trying to say. Similarly, sometimes, they wanted to change how I was presenting information.

 

“The …problem is picking which advice to take, and which to ignore. People have different opinions and it can be tough to choose which one fits better depending on how it flows with the rest of the article.”

 

However, editing must be done to publish an article or turn in any paper for school.

The only problem with editing is picking which advice to take, and which to ignore. People have different opinions, and it can be tough to choose which advice fits better. Often, it depends on how a person’s advice flows with the rest of the article.

Thus, in my experience with multiple editors this semester, I have discovered how tough it can be to juggle people’s edits, try to make everybody happy, and have the article still flow well.

 

 

What are your tips on listening to feedback? Post them below in the comments, or give my company a call so we can discuss the ways you are incorporating feedback in your writing. 

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