How to Traditionally Publish Multiple Times

How to Traditionally Publish Multiple Times

How to Traditionally Publish Multiple Times

For some writers, the problem may not be writer’s block, but what I like to call “submitter’s block.” Stephen Oliver, struggled with submissions and the fear of rejection–until he came to the Writing Gym. 

When we first met, Stephen was frustrated because he couldn’t get published despite the copious amount of writing he accomplished—up to 1,000 words each day. He believed no one liked or wanted to read his work, particularly the anthology he was trying to publish. He had read books about organizing his novel, and had attended the classes on how to publish his book.

Yet he was still getting rejected.

Despite all of his research and resourcefulness, he was still stuck, having tried to revise his manuscript on his own with no knowledge of the publishing industry.

Stephen wasn’t sure what to do. Then he read Storytelling for Pantsers: How to Write and Revise Your Novel Without an Outline, and reached out to me about some of the issues with his manuscript.

We got on a call for about an hour and talked about where he was, where he wanted to go and how he could get there. It became clear to me that Stephen was the right fit for the Writing Gym. He accepted my invitation, and we began revising his work to publishing standards. 

With each new session, Stephen recognized the difference the Writing Gym makes. He no longer had to flail among do-it-yourself solutions. Instead he had tailored feedback and a personal foot in the door of the publishing industry.

The Writing Gym is different because it’s like having a private coach, one that’s shared with a community of friends who all support and hold each other accountable.

When I made a call to an agent I know about one of Stephen’s manuscript submissions that received no responses, the agent read it right on the spot and loved it. They began to move forward with the publication of his novel Paranormal City, which is now published.

Within a week, Stephen’s second novel Shuttlers–one he was inspired to write during his time in the Writing Gym–also received a publishing contract.

Stephen no longer faces the issue of submitter’s block. To date he has sent out a total of 433 submissions, has had 12 short stories published and one forthcoming, and received two publishing contracts in the same week for his novels.

Along with his novel publications, Stephen’s short fiction has been published in anthologies What Lies Beyond by Red Penguin Books, Murder and Mayhem by Dragon Soul Press, From the Shadows by Printed Word, and Handmade Horror Stories by Frost Zone Press. His Star Trek spoof “Star Truck” appeared on the Tall Tale TV podcast–and that’s just a few of his many publishing accomplishments during his time in the Writing Gym. 

Not only did Stephen overcome submitter’s block, he now identifies as a full-time writer, putting himself out there through short stories, novels, and anthologies. Stephen is experiencing a dream many writers covet: living the author lifestyle.

Anyone who’s been thinking about the Writing Gym, go for it because Annalisa can get you that little backdoor entry you won’t find anywhere.

If you want a tailored publication plan, and you’re ready to get over submitter’s block, to move from rejection to publication, you may be the right fit for the Writing Gym. I’ve opened some time over the next couple of weeks to talk with writers who are serious about publication and living the author lifestyle. Book yourself into my calendar here.

What Do You Really Want For Your Writing Career

What Do You Really Want For Your Writing Career

What Do You Really Want For Your Writing Career

 

Today, I want to share a quote  with you from the ancient Roman poet, Seneca.

“Let all your efforts be directed to something, let it keep that end in view. It’s not activity that disturbs people, but false conceptions of things that drive them mad.”

So what does that have to do with writing?

Well, many writers never reach their goals, because they don’t know what their goals are. More precisely their goals are too vague.

When I’m speaking all over the world to writers, writers say things to me like “I want to publish. I want to be a best-seller. I want to have fans now.”

Those are all worthy and reasonable goals, but they’re really hard to reach.

For example, if you self-publish, has that met your goal of publishing? If you only have an e-book, has that met your goal of publishing?

The problem here is specificity.

In order to have quality goals, we really need to quantify what those goals are.

It’s a very different thing to get published with a self-published book versus getting published by one of the big five, like Penguin. Those are two different goals.

There’s no real judgment one way or the other, but you need to be really clear on what your goal is so that you can get there.

The first step here is to quantify your goal. This gives you clarity on your own vision for your writing career. With clarity, you can work toward a specific goal every day, meet your writing dreams, and ultimately live the author lifestyle.

Over in the Writing Gym, we help writers to get clarity and to create the exact strategy to get them toward those goals.

If that sounds like something that you’re ready for or interested in, and you’re tired of churning in the same old solutions that don’t work, you’re ready not only to get some clarity on what your author lifestyle goals are, but how to get there.

I’ve opened up a couple of times in my calendar next week to chat with you. We can hop on a call and talk about where you are, where you’d like to be, and how you can get there.

Until next time. Happy writing.

A Writer’s Worst Enemy (It’s Not What You Think)

A Writer’s Worst Enemy (It’s Not What You Think)

A Writer’s Worst Enemy (It’s Not What You Think)

 

I’m here to talk about a writer’s worst enemy, and I can promise you, it’s not what you think.

Lots of writers talk to me about writer’s block. They’re not sure what to write, and feel stuck. They don’t know where to go, what to say next, or what their next chapter should be.

I think I’ve heard it all, but we put that all under the umbrella of writer’s block. Most people get stuck and they don’t know why, and I’m here to explain how you get stuck in writer’s block.

You’re not going to believe it, but what gets in the way is your own brain.

Many of you know that most of the work that I do over in the Writing Gym is based on my study of neuroscience, how the brain learns and creates, and the secret is this:

Your mind will tell you anything to keep you in the comfort zone.

When you sit down to write, which is a risky endeavor, you’re going to share it with the world. You’re sharing your most intimate thoughts. You’re sharing a story, whether it’s your own personal narrative, or close to it.

There’s risk. It’s scary. You might not get distracted and not get it done. You might get stuck and not find the right words.

There’s lots of scare factors, and your mind wants to keep you safe and comfortable.

It sends you these messages that say things like “you can’t do this,” “this is okay, but you could do this so much better.” These are lies that come from our brain to keep us comfortable.

If you want to be a successful writer, you need to get out of that negative feedback loop, and get into the right relationship with your inner critic.

Then, the writing can flow.
Then, you write with confidence.
Then, you can circumvent some of that negative feedback and know what your strengths are.

As a writer, I have confidence based on real facts, not empty praise like “good job.” That’s not real confidence.

If you’re ready to break out of that loop, you may have had it with writer’s block, being stuck, and letting your mind take control of your writing future. I’ve opened up some time in the next week or so to chat with writers who are serious about becoming their best writer, finally finishing that novel, and getting over fear to get the writing done. 

If you’re serious about finishing your novel this year, I’d love to chat. You can get on a call and talk about where you are, where you’d like to be, and how you can get there.

Until next time. Happy writing.

Fill out my online form
The Book That Others Will Read

The Book That Others Will Read

The Book That Others Will Read

By Writing Gym Alumnus Brendan Thompson

I first got into writing on the conviction that I am a creative person with stories to tell. I have never surrendered that conviction, but in the thirty years since, I have taken a lot of time to reflect on what kind of stories I have to tell. In that time, I have done quite a bit of living, which has given me a lot more material to work with. I have read some fantastic books, visited some remarkable places, and known some amazing people. The richness of those experiences has continually added to my ideas for stories.

However, it’s not just about having ideas.

Any long time writer will tell you about the book they got halfway through writing, driven by the strength of its unique and compelling idea, only to see the project fizzle out and remain unfinished. No matter how intriguing, compelling, and alluring the idea was, it wasn’t a story.

In order to see the book through to the end, there had to be a story.

Let’s move forward, out of the 1990’s, through the 2010’s ,and up to the present day. I had assembled an oeuvre of around a million words that made up an outsized, grand, opulent, sprawling world of stories. I took my best work, a gunpowder fantasy epic, and walked it over to Annalisa Parent and her program, The Writing Gym.

It’s a scary thing to go from writing for yourself to showing your work to professionals. Often, it’s one thing to put your work in front of friends and family- I had done that. It’s also one thing to engage other writers to trade work, reading each others’ manuscripts in exchange for notes. I had done that, as well.

But to put your work in the hands of a professional writing coach, a literary agent, or an editor, is an experience of an altogether different magnitude.

I will always maintain that a good writer writes first and foremost for themselves. That’s how you get started, moving ideas into stories. However, selling your work requires moving your stories out of your own collection and into a market. You are asking people to pay money to read your stories. There has to be something in it for the reader.

Being a professional, Annalisa spared no time getting me deep, specific feedback that required extensive rewriting of my novel’s first fifty pages. Fantastic. That level of editorial interaction is what I had signed on for.

It was a double edged sword, to be sure.

It’s great to have good notes for rewriting, but it’s not great to have the task of rewriting. It’s great to find solutions to fix underlying problems, but that requires finding underlying problems. And you don’t want to find problems in your manuscript.

It’s natural to recoil in horror at the suggestion that you didn’t craft the best possible story on your first draft.

Professional writers with massive followings still get those notes from editors, and they rewrite their works accordingly.

It’s not a foolproof process, but it is a process that improves the work. Ideas move through the writer into stories, which move back and forth from the writer to the editor, becoming more and more refined, transforming into stories that are more comprehensible, more relatable, more gripping, engaging, and effective.

I found Annalisa asking me, with some reluctance, if I would go back to page one and start the process over. Completely optional, mind you, no pressure, but still her professional recommendation. Would I mind bending the narrative more in the direction she was pushing for, and doing it for the reasons that she had outlined?

And here is what I told her.

I already know the version of this story that is most for me. I had already revised, reordered, and recapitulated the narrative a hundred times, shifting the perspectives of who was telling the story, experimenting with the order of events, who did what to who, and who was the witness to it. A hundred variations on the story I was crafting. Through that, I had a hundred different versions of the story in my head, understanding the possibilities that are so tantalizing and exciting in this world that I have created. However, that is not what I want to publish.

I want to publish traditionally and for a wide audience. That means continuing the revision and the crafting of the story, refining its very carefully calibrated inner workings to find the version that appeals to a target audience, a core of readers who will engage with the book, fall in love with it, and recommend it to their friends.

I want to get beyond the story that is only for me, and get to the story that is for them.

So, write for yourself. That’s the only way to get started. When you are comfortable showing your work to others, go right ahead and do it. You might even get published right away, and if you do, congratulations are in order. For the rest of us, the next thing to do is to write some more. And start revising. Revise everything. Keep writing, and then revise that. As you keep growing, developing, and finding your voice, engage with literary professionals, get their feedback, and put it to use to further grow yourself and improve your writing.

What you will find, whether gradually or suddenly, is that you are no longer dealing in ideas.

Every time you sit down to write, you craft a story. You think in terms of story, and you can’t create in any other way. When you revise, you will revise in terms of story, and you won’t have any other way to do a revision.

You will find, as if by magic, nothing you write, no matter how personal, is ever just for you. Not any more. You will be preparing yourself for the life of a professional writer, preparing to write for your readers.

Brendan Thompson is a writer and alumnus of the Writing Gym. His film, Bae Wolf, will be available in March.

Resonate with what Brendan says? I help writers to transition from the art of writing into the business of publishing. This is what I do to help people publish and get the representation they need. If you are ready to accept what the guidelines are and are ready to sell your book, let’s chat.

How To Get a Manuscript Request in Twenty Minutes

How To Get a Manuscript Request in Twenty Minutes

How To Get A Manuscript Request in Twenty Minutes

 

Do these statements ring true for you?

  • You struggle to finish or publish your book.
  • You feel like you’ve tried everything: you’ve read the books, taken the classes, attended the workshops, read every article that exists on the internet about how to write and get published. 
  • You feel frustrated or incompetent because you haven’t been published yet.

You’re not alone, writers. I work with many writers to get past these very same issues, and today I want to share with you how I helped one of these writers finally get published.

When Barbara came to me, she had done the work–oh boy had she done the work. She even had an MFA (a Master of Fine Arts), which many writers consider to be the pinnacle of a writer’s career.

But the problem with an MFA is though the classes teach you how to write, they fail to teach you how to publish.

In fact, one of the biggest complaints the agents I work with have about MFA writers is their manuscripts are cookie cutter. Most agents can sniff out an MFA manuscript from a mile away. They’re all the same, which doesn’t give them that edge to be publishable. 

This was Barbara’s issue: she had a great concept, but needed to break out of the MFA mold and transform her manuscript into something agents would scramble to represent. 

Barbara and I worked on revisions over the course of several months. During that time, I was in conversation with several agents about Barbara, her manuscript, and how to position her book for optimal success. 

What was incredible about working with Barbara is for the first time in her writing career, the revision process was not a stress-ridden nightmare for her, but enjoyable. Barbara and I laughed together during our meetings and enjoyed each other’s company, because she finally felt she was on the right track to publication. 

When Barbara finished revising, I sent her synopsis to an agent I work with frequently. Within 20 minutes of reading the synopsis, she asked me for a full manuscript. 

Let that sink in. 

20 minutes. 

Have you waited days, weeks, even MONTHS to hear back from an agent–only to get a “no thanks, not for me”? 

Imagine getting a yes in 20 minutes. 

 Many would-be authors spin their wheels for years trying the same things over and over again, hoping for new results. Worse: they piddle their money away one workshop, one class, one MFA at a time. 

Real results ARE possible, but you’ve got to be willing to take the right steps.

I work with authors who are coachable–so eager to publish that they’re willing to put in hard work.

The authors I work with authors every day are tired of spinning their wheels, ready for real results, and ready to invest in themselves in order to get there.

I work with authors who take writing and publishing seriously without taking themselves too seriously. 

If that sounds like you, and you’re really ready, I’ve opened some spots in my calendar to talk with you about where you are, where you’d like to go, and how you can get there. Click here to choose a time to book yourself directly into my calendar, and we can hop on a call and chat.

Until next time. Happy Writing.

Get Rid Of Your Publishing Anxiety Once and For All

Get Rid Of Your Publishing Anxiety Once and For All

Get Rid Of Publishing Anxiety Once and For All

 

One question people ask me a lot is, “Is publishing a do-it-yourself activity?” “Why do I need help, can’t I get published on my own?”

It’s true, people get published all the time on their own, but often I see a lot of wasted time and effort.

When people try on their own, they struggle because they don’t know how to start, what the standards of the publishing industry are, or they’re not familiar with the industry itself.

They’ll bang up against the wall again and again, eventually giving up. Or, they’ll self publish and have mediocre results, only selling a couple of hundred books.

For the people who get help, for the people over in the Writing Gym, what I see is they’re having a whole lot more fun.

When you’re working with other people who are doing exactly what you’re doing, are as serious about publishing as you are, and have the same dreams, goals and aspirations as you do, “you’re in your tribe” as one of our writers said. (Shout out to Stephen!)

Those are your people. They want what you want. They’re a great sounding board for you, and it’s wonderful.

And while they are having more fun, and fun is good, fun doesn’t get published necessarily.

What else is great about getting the help that you need?

Well, if you’re working with the right professional, as the people over in the Writing Gym do, things happen.

I am making phone calls on behalf of my writers to literary agents and publishers, fast-tracking them to publishing and avoiding that slush pile.

Somebody said to me recently, “Oh, you know, I saw one of your Facebook lives, so I decided I could do it on my own. I’m going to call the publisher, and it’s going to work.”

Maybe it will and maybe it won’t, but I can tell you that I spend a lot of time getting lunch with publishers, agents, and so on. By doing that, I can pick up my phone and say, “Hey I got this great YA novel, here’s a brief synopsis,” and then give them the elevator pitch and ask, “How would you position this?”

Nine times out of ten when I’m on the phone with them, they say they’d love to see that project, and ask to send it over right away. 

The other day, I was on the phone with an acquisitions editor, chit-chatting with her about the industry, and got talking to her about one of our writers. She said “Please send me both manuscripts,” and off those manuscripts went.

So working with others brings you more fun and better results.

Writers in the Writing Gym get together, write on a regular basis, and receive a specific kind of feedback based on the way your brain learns and creates the best.

This process allows you to gain more confidence so when you get those rejections, you can see okay, it’s not what that particular publisher is looking for, rather than taking rejection as a setback. You’ll understand how to process feedback, integrate it into your writing, when to listen to and when to say “Thank you very much, but that’s not for me right now.”

These are all the advantages that writers have over in the Writing Gym. If this sounds like something you’d like to explore, let’s chat.

Until next time. Happy writing.

Pin It on Pinterest