3 Great Places to Submit Your Writing Before the Year Ends

3 Great Places to Submit Your Writing Before the Year Ends

Many people make resolutions each year about writing or getting published. Few follow through. It can be easy to let time slip by without actually making any forward progress on your writing goals, and then find yourself in the same position at the end of the year as in the beginning.

Did you set writing or publishing goals for 2020? Were you hoping to make 2020 the year you got published? If so, time is running out—there are only a few weeks left till the year’s end.

Of course, I don’t think 2020 went the way any of us planned. But if you were planning on trying to get your name in print, it’s not too late to give it your best shot.

It can be tricky finding publishing opportunities with upcoming deadlines that you might miss, especially when you’re short on time.

That’s why we’ve put together a list of three interesting publishing opportunities and contests with deadlines this month that you can submit to today. 

Here’s a pro-tip on how to ensure your work gets selected: talk to a professional who understands what literary journals and publishers look for in short stories. Our experienced writing coaches can work with you on your first 5 pages to give you tailored feedback so you’re 100% ready to publish. Drop yourself into our calendar to reserve your slot.

If these aren’t your thing, no worries. We put out a curated list of the latest publishing opportunities each week. Be sure to check back here in 7 days for 3 more opportunities! Or, you can get on our mailing list to have this list delivered straight to your inbox. Never miss a publishing opportunity again. Click below to sign up.

Get Weekly Publishing Opportunities


Written Tales’ “Tis the Season” Edition

Who They Are:  From their website: “We are here to help bring literature back to the forefront of society through short stories, flash fiction, and poetry….The goal of Written Tales is to give new and seasoned writers a place where they have an uncensored voice. A world stage where their work can reach maximum exposure through multiple platforms.”

What They Publish: Poems and short stories fitting the “Tis the Season” theme.

Deadline: December 7.

Length: 50-1500 words for short stories.

Get more information and submit here.


The New York Times’ Modern Love Series

Who They Are: From their website: “We seek true stories on finding love, losing love and trying to keep love alive…Although Modern Love has evolved into a podcast, a book, a TV show and Tiny Love Stories in its 16 years, the column’s central mission remains the same: to publish honest personal essays about contemporary relationships.”

What They Publish: From their website: “We welcome essays that explore subjects such as adoption, polyamory, technology, race and friendship — anything that could reasonably fit under the heading ‘Modern Love.'”

Length: Essays should be limited to 1,500-1,700 words.

What They Pay: $400 per accepted essay.

Get more information and submit here.


Sci-Fest L.A.’s Roswell Award

Who They Are: From their website: “Sci-Fest L.A. and Light Bringer Project are proud to take a leadership role in fostering emerging science fiction writers…The Roswell Award international short science fiction story competition accepts entries from emerging writers age 16 and older. Selected finalists will be chosen and have their stories read in their honor by celebrity guests during a special performance. All finalists and honorable mentions will be recognized for their work.”

What They Publish: Short science fiction stories.

Length: 500-1500 words.

What They Pay: First, Second, and Third place Roswell Award winners will receive $500, $250, and $100 USD cash prizes.

Get more information and submit here.


Is your work good enough to get published?

Many publications receive thousands and thousands of submissions. Are you confident that your work is strong enough to stand out from the rest?

We help writers hone their craft so they can feel confident about submitting their best work to publications or competitions. If you’re serious about publishing, you can speak with us to see how we can help you put your best foot forward when you submit your work. Book a call with us today.

 

 

Get Rid Of Your Publishing Anxiety Once and For All

Get Rid Of Your Publishing Anxiety Once and For All

Get Rid Of Publishing Anxiety Once and For All

Hey there, writers and muse daters.

One of the questions that people ask me a whole lot is “is publishing a do-it-yourself activity?” “Why do I need help, can’t I just get published on my own?”

Yes people can get published all the time on their own, but what I end up seeing often is a lot of wasted time and effort.
When people try on their own, they struggle because they don’t know how to start, what the standards of the publishing industry are, or they’re not even familiar with the industry itself.

They’ll bang up against the wall again and again, eventually giving up. Or they’ll self publish and have mediocre results at that, selling a couple of hundred books.

Whereas for the people who get help, for the people who are over in the Writing Gym, what I end up seeing is that they’re having a whole lot more fun.

When you’re working with other people who are doing exactly what you’re doing, who are as serious about publishing as you are, and have the same dreams, goals and aspirations as you do, “you’re in your tribe” as one of our writers said. (Shout out to Stephen!)

Those are your people. They want what you want. They’re a great sounding board for you, and it’s wonderful. They’re having more fun, and fun is good but fun doesn’t get published necessarily.

What else is great about getting the help that you need?

Well, if you’re working with the right professional as the people over in the Writing Gym do, things happen.

I am making phone calls on behalf of my writers to literary agents and publishers, so they’re fast-tracked to publishing, and avoid that slush pile.

Somebody said to me recently, “Oh, you know, I saw one of your Facebook lives and so I just decided that I could do it on my own. I’m just going to call the publisher and it’s going to work.”

Maybe it will and maybe it won’t but I can tell you that I spend a lot of time getting lunch with a lot of publishers, agents, and so on. By doing that, I can just pick up my phone and call and say “hey I got this great YA novel and here’s a brief synopsis,” give them the elevator pitch and ask “how would you position this?”

Nine times out of ten when I’m on the phone with them? They say they’d love to see that project and ask to send it over right away. That happened to me very recently.

The other day, I was on the phone with an acquisitions editor, chit-chatting with her about the industry and got talking to her about one of our writers. She said “please send me over both manuscripts,” and off those manuscripts went.

So working with others brings you more fun. It brings you better results. Writers in the Writing Gym get together, write on a regular basis and receive a specific kind of feedback, that’s based on the way that your brain learns and creates the best.

This process allows you to gain more confidence so that when you get those rejections, you can see okay, it’s just not what that particular publisher is looking for, rather than taking it as a setback. You’ll understand how to process feedback, how to integrate it into your writing, when to really listen to it and when to just say “thank you very much, but that’s not for me right now.”

These are all the advantages that writers have over in the Writing Gym. If this sounds like something you’d like to explore, let’s chat.

Until next time. Happy writing.

3 Great Places to Submit Your Writing Before the Year Ends

Get Published in These 3 Well-Respected Lit Mags and Earn Up to $250

Are you hoping to make a name for yourself by writing? Do you wish you could make a buck or two while you’re at it?

If your goal is to achieve fame and fortune as a writer, it can be tough knowing where to start.

Getting shorter works published in well-renowned magazines and journals is a great way to get your foot in the door. Prestigious magazines will stand out in your portfolio and mark you as an accomplished writer, something that can only help you in your future publishing endeavors. Plus, because these magazines are well-known, they often pay more than other publications.

As nice as that sounds, it’s not always easy to know which magazines and journals are well-known and high-paying.

That’s why we’ve curated a list of 3 journals and magazines accepting submissions that are not only well-respected, but that pay writers up to $250 per submission.

Here’s a pro-tip on how to ensure your work gets selected: talk to a professional who understands what literary journals and publishers look for in short stories. Our experienced writing coaches can work with you on your first 5 pages to give you tailored feedback so you’re 100% ready to publish. Drop yourself into our calendar to reserve your slot.

If these aren’t your thing, no worries. We put out a curated list of the latest publishing opportunities each week. Be sure to check back here in 7 days for 3 more opportunities! Or, you can get on our mailing list to have this list delivered straight to your inbox. Never miss a publishing opportunity again. Click below to sign up.

Get Weekly Publishing Opportunities


Upstreet

Who They Are:  From their website: “Upstreet is an independently owned and published, nationally distributed magazine… It is based in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts, is an award-winning annual literary anthology containing the best new fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction available.”

What They Publish: Unpublished fiction and creative nonfiction pieces.

Length: 5,000 words or less.

What They Pay: Between $50 and $250 for short stories or essays, plus one complimentary copy of the magazine.

Get more information and submit here.


AGNI

Who They Are: From their website: “AGNI is a literary magazine housed at Boston University and known ‘among readers around the world,’ as the writers group PEN put it, ‘for publishing important new writers early in their careers, many of them translated into English for the first time.’ The print magazine appears twice yearly, in late April and late October.”

What They Publish: Poetry, essays, fiction, interviews, reviews.

Length: No word limits, thoughspace is at a premium and length sometimes affects [their] decisions.”

What They Pay: $10 per printed (or printed-out) page for accepted prose, and $20 per page for accepted poetry, up to a maximum of $150, plus a year’s subscription to AGNI.

Get more information and submit here.


Grain Magazine

Who They Are: From their website: “Grain, the journal of eclectic writing, is a literary quarterly that publishes engaging, eclectic, and challenging writing and art by Canadian and international writers and artists. Every issue features superb new writing from both developing and established writers.”

What They Publish: Unpublished poetry, fiction, and literary nonfiction; queries for submissions of work in other forms (i.e. short plays, comics, etc.) are also accepted.

Length: Individual poems, sequences, or suites up to a maximum of six pages; fiction or literary nonfiction to a maximum of 3,500 words.

What They Pay: $50 per page to a maximum of $250, plus two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Get more information and submit here.


Is your work good enough to get published?

Many publications receive thousands and thousands of submissions. Are you confident that your work is strong enough to stand out from the rest?

We help writers hone their craft so they can feel confident about submitting their best work to publications. If If you’re serious about publishing, you can speak with us to see how we can help you put your best foot forward when you submit your work. Book a call with us today.

 

 

You Too, Can Get the Attention of a Major Literary Agent with the Right Query

You Too, Can Get the Attention of a Major Literary Agent with the Right Query

You Too, Can Get the Attention of a Major Literary Agent with the Right Query

Hey there writers and muse daters. Today I want to talk about Aaron, who’s a fantastic writer and has done some amazing work in the Writing Gym. He’s put together a 90,000 word literary fiction novel, that tackles themes such as identity, achievement, attraction, and incest. 

Before joining me, Aaron had completed his novel, which he had dedicated six months to. After completing his novel, he went into the querying process thinking, “Oh, the hard part is over. I’m just going to send out my letter, who wouldn’t beg to read this?” 

He even had a personal connection to one agent, and sent this agent his first query. The agent responded asking for the manuscript. Aaron sent it and twenty minutes later, got rejected.

He was shocked.

In hindsight, he felt foolish but at that moment he felt that his understanding of the world had completely turned on its head. So he set out to research to try and understand what the issue was, whether it be the substance of his query, improving his network, getting in touch with agents, or figuring out how to access more resources. 

Then he found me. 

“I could tell that you care about the writers, it’s really immeasurable and hard to describe but I felt like that was completely there. You had devised a system where you spent time working with authors, but also spent time networking with agents, which is exactly what I needed”

Aaron and I began working together right away, and I read his manuscript. I invited him to join small group sessions to think about writing and craft, which he found helpful. 

Afterwards we started thinking about our marketing strategy—whom were the agents we were going after? What was it that we were going to use as the hook? How are we going to convey to them in a page that, essentially, this is a story that’s right for them? 

Aaron went into the querying process hesitantly, because of his initial experience with that one agent. He believed that agents don’t reply to blind submissions or cold query submissions, because they have enough of a pipeline from their clients or had other networks. 

He found that while that belief may be 80% accurate, there are definitely exceptions and he was one of them.

After working with me, he found that a number of letters he had sent out received same day responses asking for full manuscripts, and he got positive feedback on the content of the query itself. 

Aaron getting full manuscript requests is huge because the typical pattern is that you send the query, the agent’s interested and say “okay, send me ten or fifty pages.” Oftentimes, the manuscript gets better as the story progresses, so getting a full manuscript request is important.

This is especially great because the content of his work and query were both relatively polarizing, but he was met with success, having even gotten a response in under five minutes.

Eventually, Aaron got in contact with Jeff Kleinman over at Folio Lit, who then offered to share the manuscript with his colleagues if he wasn’t interested, which is huge. Aaron has been getting requests from high-quality agencies, the “Harvards” of the literary world. This is a big celebration!

I asked Aaron what he thought about his experiences in the Writing Gym

“Based on my personal experience, I can’t recommend the Writing Gym enough. It was the kind of catalyst that helped me actualize the potential of my writing.” 

Well there you have it folks. We’re so proud of Aaron here at the Writing Gym, and look forward to celebrating his future accomplishments.

Does this sound like you? Well, I help writers to transition from the art of writing into the business of publishing. This is what I do to help people publish and get the representation they need. If you are ready to accept what the guidelines are and are ready to sell your book, let’s chat.

Until next time. Happy writing.

3 Great Places to Submit Your Writing Before the Year Ends

3 High-Paying Publishing Opportunities with Upcoming November Deadlines

Are you looking for publishing opportunities? Are you tired of not getting paid for your work?

You spend hours looking for opportunities, and find you don’t have any time left to write. Even worse, the opportunities you do find don’t pay–making all that effort seem hardly worth it.

We’ve saved you time and done the hard work for you. If you have short fiction ready to submit, these opportunities that could be just what you’re looking for.

We’ve curated a list of literary magazines looking for your short stories, excerpts and novellas this month. Get paid up to $45/page for your work.

Here’s a pro-tip on how to ensure your work gets selected: talk to a professional who understands what literary journals and publishers look for in short stories. Our experienced writing coaches can work with you on your first 5 pages to give you tailored feedback so you’re 100% ready to publish. Drop yourself into our calendar to reserve your slot.

If these aren’t your thing, no worries. We put out a curated list of the latest publishing opportunities each week. Be sure to check back here in 7 days for 3 more opportunities! Or, you can get on our mailing list to have this list delivered straight to your inbox. Never miss a publishing opportunity again. Click below to sign up.

Get Weekly Publishing Opportunities


The Fiddlehead

Who They Are: From their website: “The Fiddlehead was first established in 1945. What began as a mimeographed 8-page journal stapled together by Alfred Bailey is now a veritable institution of literary culture in Canada. For over 70 years, The Fiddlehead has continually upheld its mandate to publish accomplished poetry, short fiction, and Canadian literature reviews; to discover and promote new writing talent; to represent the Atlantic region’s lively cultural and literary diversity; and to place the best of new and established Canadian writing in an international context.”

What They’re Looking For: From their website: “The Fiddlehead is open to good writing in English or translations into English from all over the world and in a variety of styles, including experimental genres. Our editors are always happy to see new unsolicited works in fiction, including excerpts from novels, creative nonfiction, and poetry. We also publish reviews, and occasionally other selected creative work such as excerpts from plays.”

Length: Maximum 6,000 words for fiction, creative-nonfiction, or novel excerpts; maximum 10 pages for a play excerpt.

Pay: $60 CAD per published page, plus two complimentary copies of the issue with your work. All nationalities welcome to submit.

Deadline: November 30, 2020.

Get more information and submit here.


Deep Magic

Who They Are: From their website: “Deep Magic is a quarterly electronic magazine that publishes clean short fiction in the fantasy and science fiction genres. If you can tell a gripping story that doesn’t rely on sex, swearing, and graphic violence—you’ve come to the right place.”

What They’re Looking For: Clean fantasy and science fiction stories.

Length: 1,000-40,000 words.

Pay: $.08 per word for the first 7,499 words, with payment capped at $599.92 for stories longer than 7,499 words.

Deadline: November 30, 2020.

Get more information and submit here.


LampLight

Who They Are: LampLight is a quarterly literary magazine published as print and ebook that features dark fiction in a similar style to “The Twilight Zone.”

What They’re Looking For: “We go for stories that are dark, literary; we are looking for the creepy, the weird and the unsettling. No specific sub-genres or themes, just good stories. We do not accept stories with the following: vampires, zombies, werewolves, serial killers, hitmen, excessive gore or sex, excessive abuse against women, revenge fantasies, cannibals, high fantasy.”

Length: Maximum 7,000 words.

Pay: Unpublished Fiction: $.03 per word, $150.00 max. Reprints: $.01 per word.

Deadline: November 15, 2020.

Get more information and submit here.


Is your work good enough to get published?

Many publications receive thousands and thousands of submissions. Are you confident that your work is strong enough to stand out from the rest?

We help writers hone their craft so they can feel confident about submitting their best work to publications. If If you’re serious about publishing, you can speak with us to see how we can help you put your best foot forward when you submit your work. Book a call with us today.

 

 

Confused About Publishing? Got Writer’s Block? Let’s Fix That.

Confused About Publishing? Got Writer’s Block? Let’s Fix That.

Confused About Publishing? Got Writer’s Block? Let’s Fix That. 

Hey there, Writers and muse daters. Many dream of becoming a successful author. Few ever make it. So where do they go wrong?

In order to become an author–let alone a successful one– you have to do a whole lot more than write. The path to publication is long and there are many, many places to get lost.

That’s why our VIP programs are designed to walk you through the whole process–or just the part you’re stuck on, if that’s what you need. 

We give you the coaching, support, knowledge, and support you need to go from struggling writer to published author.

We work with writers at three different phases:

  • Write or finish a novel in eight weeks
  • Revise novel to publishable and find an agent
  • Expand author platform and sell their book

We’ve gotten many authors in different stages of the writing process, to published. 

Sounds like something you’re interested in?

The Writing Gym is accepting select writers to join our community of successful, published authors.

If you’re serious about publishing in 2020, let’s chat. Drop yourself into my calendar here to talk to a member of our team.

Until next time. Happy Writing. 

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